Toggle mobile menu

Cooperation with the customs authorities in the EU

Norwegian companies with intellectual property rights in the EU can ask for assistance from the customs authorities in the EU to halt pirated goods.

Cooperation with the customs authorities in EU countries

Norwegian companies with valid intellectual property rights in an EU member state can submit a notification (application) and ask for assistance from the customs authorities in the EU to halt pirated goods. Holders of trademark or design registrations from the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) are entitled to judicial prosecution of IPR infringements in EU member states.

There are two types of applications:

  • National applications: an application submitted to an EU member state requesting the customs authorities for assistance in the specific country.
  • EU application: an application submitted to an EU member state requesting the customs authorities for assistance in the country concerned; and to the customs authorities in one or more other EU member states for assistance in their respective territories.

Read the European Commission manual on application for assistance in EU countries (pdf)

Enforcement Database (EDB) – assistance from the EU enforcement authorities

The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) has developed a new database tool to make it simpler for rights holders to apply for assistance from the enforcement authorities in the EU to halt piracy.

Norwegian companies or individuals can use the database if they have a valid trademark or design registration in the EU.

You can apply for assistance electronically through this database, and the information will become directly available to the customs authorities in the EU. Companies can help the customs authorities and police to protect their branded goods against counterfeiting by entering relevant information about their products. This may include pictures of products that are trademark or design-protected in the EU, details about your business, contact information, logistics, packaging or other information you think may be useful for the customs authorities to distinguish between fake and genuine goods. The database has a very high level of data security.

All information is translated into the official languages of the EU. This is an important step to ensure a good flow of relevant information across national borders.

Companies have to create a profile and upload information on products and rights. Use of the database is free of charge.

Link to Enforcement Database (EDB)

On the EU-Observatory website you will find an information video about the Enforcement Database (EDB).

Consider making a "Brand Identification Guide" for your company

Some companies choose to develop a "Brand Identification Guide" which can be issued to enforcement authorities such as customs and police. In this guide, the rights holders can provide information and show pictures of pirated products and genuine products, and show what officials should look out for in order to identify fakes. You can provide information on how legal goods are packaged, and what transport routes are used for the legal flow of goods, so that customs and police officers can be alerted more easily if consignments of goods deviate from this.

Last update: 3. February 2017